About thetraveltotaste

Two hospitality workers on the search for the perfect dining experience.

An exercise in excellence. Dining @ Tom Aikens

An exercise in excellence. Dining @ Tom Aikens

London streets roar with city life. The tube is flooded with folks eager to get home after a long day, the weather is…bleak. However it is London, the ever grey sky looms overhead with the constant threat of rain but we persevere and it’s going to take a lot more than a little wet weather to keep Jess and I from our next destination. Restaurant Tom Aikens.

We walk into the busy restaurant and are quickly seated, it is of course tasting menu for us no doubt and we are both keen to get started. Tom offers a seven course taster and with the decision made snacks arrive on cue. Rillette, quail egg with truffle, puffed pork skin, the treats are almost overwhelming. We of course demolish these bites and get ready to move on to our next courses.

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However standing between us is a mountain of bread! It is not like me to mention bread but the bread here is something else. Brioche, sourdough, porcini rye, it has everything. Paired with butter, oh glorious butter. This butter was flavoured with cheese and bacon, and another with mushroom. Can things possibly get any better. Usually I don’t want to fill up on bread but here, just tuck me into a corner with the remainder of the basket and I’ll be happy. No seriously.

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In between mouthfuls of rolls our first course arrives. Crab, coriander, horseradish snow, coconut, crab vinaigrette. A light starter pairing freshly picked crab meat with the icy bite of horseradish. Coriander and coconut gave an almost green curry feel to the dish without taking away from the lovely oceanic flavour of the crab. A light start but with plenty of flavour to get us ready for everything that was to come.

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Rabbit, rabbit boudin, sorrel, nasturtiums. This was a rabbit dish like nothing I’ve had before. The rabbit is delicate in flavour, lightly poached and served cool. The boudin gives great depth to the dish while sorrel ice and fresh nasturtiums provide acidity and freshness. It was an interesting dish to eat, as if the rabbit had tumbled into the flower garden. A nice design rather then the usual braised rabbit with sticky game jus.

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A scallop shell is whisked in front of us. Baked scallop, grains and bread consommé. Wow. This dish was utterly incredible, the scallop had a rich, roasted flavour that, combined with the decadent clear stock was utterly moorish. The grains had a porridge like consistency that made for soaking up sauce and consuming each flavour packed bite a treat. Suddenly we are completely sucked into Tom’s world and cannot wait to see what he will treat us with next.

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The next treat arrives in the form of house made ricotta, green olive juice, honey jelly, pine nuts. The ricotta comes fresh and in sheets, the pine nut in the form of sorbet and the honey jelled so lightly that they almost dissolve on the tongue. A vegetarian dish with bones, this dish had great structure and texture without being over complicated. The ricotta was fresh with a slight sourness, the green olive juice is slightly bitter but very fruity and the pine nut gave in to the rich creamy mouthfeel that all good cheese dishes should have. This dish was a surprise after the scallop but gave a pleasant change on the palette before we moved into the main performance of our degustation.

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Open with a bang. Halibut, salt baked celeriac, chicken wing meat, truffle butter. This is a fish dish. Aikens writes books on fish cookery and dishes like this show why. Perfectly cooked halibut pairs with earthy celeriac and mounds of black truffle. This is fish that stands up as a main course, I think people’s predisposition to dislike fish is due to the notion that it tastes fishy. Wrong, good fish, fresh fish tastes of meat. Bright, oceanic but with a richness that stands up to any meat course. This was a fantastic dish. The celeriac added deep, roasted notes along with our earthy friend mister tuber melanosporum, that’s truffle in other words. All of these flavours pushed the fish into another realm, and it was a delight to destroy.

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Now for the main event. The tasting menu says piglet or grouse. Our fantastic waiter seems to know us so well and of course brings both. Piglet belly, braised and roasted, baked aubergine, smoked apple. A dish filled with classic flavours, roasted pork with crackle that snaps underneath the fork, the smokey apple and the creamy aubergine. A roast dinner in a new form, the pork is of ridiculous quality and tastes as though it dined on only the finest. The smoked apple brings sweetness and of course the smoke that gives a flavour reminiscent of Carolina BBQ with the cream of the aubergine bringing everything together. Jess and I fight to get forkfuls.

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Now for a taste of the woodland. Allenheads Grouse, grouse sausage, barley, blackberry. Another classic pairing of game bird and berry. This dish tasted of the woods, the blackberry brings a forest note cuddled up alongside the games richness that is perfectly cooked grouse. The sausage is bold and full flavoured with the barley bringing great toasty notes. The stomach is filling but I know that dessert still calls.

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Once again we are agonised by choice, chocolate or pistachio. We have great waiters who are happy to decide for us. Why not have both. Ok! Pistachio, parfait, pistachio cake, pistachio praline. The many textures of snackable, oily, delightful pistachio. The cake is soft and crumbly, the parfait rich and creamy and the praline snaps deliciously. Gorgeously green this dessert brought this humble little nut to new heights and the dish was devoured in but a few mouthfuls.

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I can see Jess’s eyes bulging at the remaining dessert. Chocolate & violet, violet sorbet, cocoa crumbs, honeycomb, crystallised violets. Dessert is about texture and this dish had plenty, cake, cookies, crumbs, sorbets, mousse. Every bite was intricate and exciting, violet is such an under-utilised flavour and brings sweetness, floral aroma and just overall depth to a dish. I love violet in dessert and here it is paired with decadent chocolate. I had to wrestle the plate from my beautiful fiancé just to get a taste.

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With stomachs filled we settle back, then our wonderful waiter says “fancy seeing tom?” Well after dining like that we have to meet the magician in charge, so we head down to the basement to see the engine room. A quick handshake with the maestro and we leave the boys to their busy scrub and remaining pastry orders. Our table is now flooded with petit four, lucky we saved room. The chocolate box is full of delicious treats, green olive lollipops, black truffle ice cream, berry meringues, lemon tarts the treats seem endless and Jess and I must try them all.

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So with stomachs filled to bursting point we waddle out of the restaurant. Tom Aikens is creating food with a new voice, it is original, interesting and most importantly delicious. If you’re in London step off the dreary streets and step into Toms world.

Be sure to ask for more bread.

Josh and Jess

Dined November 2013
Tom Aikens Restaurant
43 Elystan St Chelsea, London, England
http://www.tomaikens.co.uk

Amass ing! An incredible evening @ Amass.

Amass ing! An incredible evening @ Amass.

It is a frost worthy Nordic evening, silver mist hangs overhead and a light dew dapples our coats as we climb the stairs to our next foodie adventure. Matthew Orlando, former chef of Per Se, Noma and a host of other serious places has opened his new venture. Amass. Graffiti lines the walls, the kitchen is insanely open and the crowd is a mix of dressed socialites and hipsters. This is Amass, because food is for everyone and they don’t care how you come.

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We’re greeted and seated at what can only be described as the best seat in the house. Inches away from the pass we can see the kitchen pumping out seriously fine fare, snacks arrive and we jump straight into the world of Nordic food with attitude. Cod head rillette looks like a stegosaur, grey spikes peaking high off the plate, the spikes are in fact deliciously puffed fish skin filled with the savoury rillette mix. Textural, creamy and delightful.

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Next a curious looking wrapped parcel arrives, this dish was probably my favourite as it was so complex. Wrapped inside a vividly green chard leaf was a baby leek that had been perfectly steamed and stuffed with pieces of salted mackerel. The bright nasturtium on top brings bitterness in contrast to the salty mackerel and sweet leek, this dish wanted to be eaten! Bitter greens, salted mackerel vinaigrette, young onion. And eaten it was. Yum.

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Another semi snack dish arrives; crispy oats, hot smoked foie gras, walnut. A winter snow is the only way to describe the texture of the foie, delicately shaved over a wafer thin crisp made of oat. The foie is rich, with the smoke bringing a lovely depth after eating. At this time we are also tempted with some insanely good fermented flatbread, charred and gnarly, Jess and I could not stop eating, but there’s more food to come and I need to save room.

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The next course arrives looking like a piece of art, squid, beans, sour plums, marigold. This beautiful dish was oceanic and herbaceous, the unctuous, melting squid, the little pop of sour plum and the wonderfully crisp green bean. This is cookery performed beautifully, complexity concealed by simplicity. This is the mark of a true craftsmen, it is a pleasure to eat.

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Burnt kale, chicken skin, almond. We hear our next course crackling away in a pan, then it arrives, the kale is crisp in places, wilted in others, it is delightfully textural. The chicken skin gives that slovenly fattiness that is just naughty and enjoyable, almond is another little crackle. The dish is devoured, that is all I can say. Earthy kale, chicken fat, more please!

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An egg is placed in front of us. Glistening golden and smelling of rich toffee, it sits in a velouté of sorrel and young herbs. The egg yolk is cooked slightly beyond runny allowing for different flavours to develop. It has an almost lingering sweetness, with caramel and honey notes. The velouté brings the whole thing into the earth with wonderful herbaceousness.

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Now as Jess and I are in the midst of an extended tasting menu the fantastic food just keeps arriving. Danish monkfish with ceps and brown butter. Fish and mushroom is such a great combination. The mushrooms provide an intense savouriness that allows the meaty flavours of fish to shine. Brown butter here brings a hazelnut, salty delight swimming in and amongst the exquisitely cooked monkfish. From the sea to me. Dive in.

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Now time for some serious meat, it arrives as lamb breast, squash, baby corn and sunflower seeds. This was a dish celebrating the wonderful squash and corn. Don’t get me wrong the lamb is mighty tasty, soft and fork tender I polish this plate off in just a few bites. Sunflower makes for a delicious bite and oiliness that pairs well with the rich lamb. Yum!

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With our savoury courses finished Jess and I sit back and wait on dessert. Brought to us by chef Orlando himself our little taste of wonder. Blueberries, the freshest of the nearly finished season, drizzled with honey from a Nordic fisherman. Yes I said a fisherman. Matt tells us the story of a jaunty man on his boat bringing in many treats from the sea, one day he arrived with jars of honey. When asked where the honey was from he replied “the boat of course.” The fellow keeps bees on the roof of his fishing vessel. A wonderful story of how food comes to us in incredible ways. The honey is deliciously floral and makes the little sweet pops of blueberry step forward in a different light. This is a dish that makes me marvel at the world and all of the bounty that lays before us chefs.

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Our evening draws to a close and dessert is served. Apple, black pepper ice cream, bitter caramel, oregano. Intrigued? Jess and I certainly were. The apples are cooked in the caramel, the heat of black pepper contradicts the cold cold ice cream, oregano brings spice to the dish absurdly reminiscent of apple pie. It is an incredible play on spice, heat, cold, sweet. It is fantastic and ends our meal in a way that almost sums up our dining experience. Incredible.

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Petit four is whisked out with some serious coffee, kitchen is on the scrub and we take this opportunity to snack on some bay cakes and chat with the chefs. Matt is humble, driven and fantastically passionate. Each of his chefs look like creating great food is what they do rather than just a job. It is infectious and Jess and I truly love meeting inspiring people that love the industry as much as us.

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It’s amassing!

Josh and Jess

Amass Restaurant
Revshalevej 153; 1432 Copenhagen, Denmark
http://www.amassrestaurant.com

Off with their heads. Day 71

Off with their heads. Day 71

Now you have all heard of William the Conqueror right? Well if you haven’t then a quick trip to Wikipedia is a must. One of his greatest achievements is the building of Her Majesty’s Royal Palace and Fortress, known by us today as the Tower of London. Built in 1078, this historic building is one of many must see attractions in London and is on our list for today.

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Now remember when I told you about all the wonderful free things London has to offer, this is not one of them. It will cost you around £20 to get in, however you can spend the entire day here if you want and every half hour a free tour is offered. Led by one of many Yeoman Warders or Beefeaters as they are commonly known, this tour allows you to wander through the tower listening to stories of events that have occurred and get a history on the people that have walked the beaten paths before us. Our guide seemed to have fun when talking about executions on Tower Hill and even added a few beheading puns along the way. He mentioned tails of those who were imprisoned here and those who died a painful death. Anne Boleyn being one of the executed, is said to still haunt the White Tower as a ghost carrying her head under her arm. I definitely recommend this tour to anybody interested in a visit to the Tower of London, you will not be disappointed.

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Looking around the fortress it is easy to envision what once stood here. A moat once flowed around the outer wall and the entrance, now known as Traitors Gate is still standing tall. At the top of the towers are metal archers where guards once stood and within the towers themselves are exhibitions of artefacts and stories of the history of the Tower. Pitch black Ravens in the courtyard remain caged due to the superstitions of previous kings and queens. A giant Wooden trebuchet sits menacingly beyond the Stoney walls.

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Standing in the middle of the fortress is the White Tower. This palace was home to many kings and queens throughout English history and is now the location of the armoury and weaponry exhibits. Walking though the White Tower, personal armour of King Henry VIII is on display surrounded by canons and guns once used to hold down and protect the Fortress. Across the courtyard is the Waterloo Barracks, also known as the Jewel House. It is here that the Crown Jewels are housed and Josh and I cannot wait to go inside. We travel along observing the service ware, royal orbs and ceremonial swords until we finally see the crown. My jaw drops. My eyes widen. My smile grows. Some of the largest jewels I have ever seen are embedded in this crown made entirely of gold. It’s a magnificent sight, I wish I could look at it forever. Looking down I see my own diamonds sparkle and my smile grows even more.

imageThe Tower of London is not complete without standing along the outer wall and gazing along the River Thames towards the Tower Bridge, one of the most spectacular bridges in London. I get a bit trigger happy with my camera before we head home to get ready for dinner. A dinner we have been waiting for since we booked all those months ago.

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Josh has many culinary idols that inspire him every day to be the best chef he can be. One of those idols is Gordon Ramsay. Not because he is a tv superstar or because he screams and shouts, but because he has built an empire based on his skills and abilities as a chef and businessman. One of his restaurants has the title of holding three Michelin stars consecutively for the longest period of time and this is where we will be dining this evening. Tonight dinner is at Restaurant Gordon Ramsay on Royal Hospital Road.

Restaurant Gordon Ramsay is not what I expected at all. The interior is warm and inviting with guests seated on round tables sprawled across the room. Crisp, long white linen dresses the tables and napkins are wrapped in gold. This restaurant screams elegance and we cannot wait to begin with the food. Restaurant manager Jean-Claude greets us with a friendly welcome and wishes us a pleasant evening. With Champagne in hand it’s time to look over the menu. Something this restaurant does is offer a different menu to the host than the rest of the table. The difference being that the hosts’ menu includes prices and the others do not, I think it’s a nice touch. Spoiled for choice we decide to choose from the al a carte menu, something we have not done in a long time.

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House made bread, canapés and amuse bouche begins to flow to the table. Josh is in food heaven and he only gets more excited as more and more food comes through the kitchen door. “This is the best fish dish I have ever eaten!” Did I hear that correctly Josh? Such a statement is well deserved as Josh devours his turbot before I could sneak any from his plate, so you’ll have to wait for Josh’s review to hear how it tasted! All the food at Restaurant Gordon Ramsay was cooked without fault and each flavour was perfectly balanced. When you dine at Royal Hospital Road you are very likely to run into famous chefs or celebrities, tonight we dined tables away from Katy Perry and John Mayer. I have fallen in love with Restaurant Gordon Ramsay and we can see why this restaurant receives the accolades it does.

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Before we leave we are offered a tour of the kitchen, something we never refuse! Walking through the doors we see Head Chef and Ramsay’s protégée Clare Smyth having a conversation with one of the waitstaff. We thank her for an incredible meal and watch the kitchen team as they work in unison, the clean down is so thorough even Josh is impressed. Our experience at Restaurant Gordon Ramsay was unforgettable and we will be recommending it to all of our friends, family and readers.

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Feast!

Jess and Josh

Souvenir shopping in street markets. Day 70

Souvenir shopping in street markets. Day 70

What a beautiful day outside it is today, Josh however is so tired from work we spend the morning in, again. Sooner or later we will see London before lunch but for now we laze about waiting for Josh to once again leave for work. Because of the rare London sunshine, I decided to join Josh on the venture to Notting Hill and then start my day from there.

Located a few blocks behind The Ledbury is Portobello Road. Most know this spot is the place to go for great coffee, funky restaurants and bargains in the street markets. I start with a coffee and what a coffee it was. It was rich and creamy, perfect temperature and finished with a pattern on top. It has been so long since I really enjoyed a coffee, and at £1.30 it was a bargain too. I sat in the window, drinking my coffee, reading the local paper, eating a caramel slice and watching the people stroll by. Before now I never use to sit alone in a coffee shop but it has become my favourite thing to do.

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Perked up on caffeine I head onto the street. It’s almost closing time and fruit and veg vendors are shouting new prices for their produce. All boxes for one quid! If I didn’t have to carry them back on the tube I would have bought the lot. All of the produce you could think of and more was on sale here and it all looked fresh and vibrant. There was fennel, radish, carrots and beetroot, all thrown together like a colourful artwork from Picasso. As well as produce, a lot of antique stores are along Portobello Rd along with leather goods, clothing and lots of London souvenirs. A little secret when dealing with vendors … all prices are generally the same store to store however no one wants to lose out on a sale. Ask how much, if you have seen it cheaper somewhere else or just think it’s too much, say no and walk away from them. One in three will come back and ask you what price you want for it or they will discount it. I managed to get a few presents a little cheaper than advertised which is always good when holidaying on a budget.

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The markets go on for several blocks, never being a real fan of markets I get tired of seeing the same things in all store and head back towards the tube. I can see my mum really loving London for these little street markets as there will be plenty more to come I’m sure.

Shop till you drop.

Jess and Josh

“To walk alone in London is the greatest rest” – Virginia Woolf. Day 68 and 69

“To walk alone in London is the greatest rest” – Virginia Woolf. Day 68 and 69

Google has become my friend today as I set myself up on the couch and research all that London has to offer. With Josh on an afternoon shift, I take this time to write a list of all the sights I’m going to see over the next few weeks whiles Josh is at work. If anyone tells you that you cannot explore London on a budget, don’t believe them! Over the next few weeks I’m going to show you some of the popular tourist destinations and then some not so popular off the beaten track destinations. For more details checkout websites like Timeout London for 101 free things to do in London.

Day 69

Armed with a list a mile long, I head out for my first official day of exploring. Stop number one, the Museum of London. This museum explores the history of London and the people within it. It’s located in north east London and is absolutely free, unless you want to explore specialist exhibitions on throughout the year. When first entering, you realise how different museums are in London than the other places we have been. Pops of colour are everywhere which makes reading the facts much more interesting. There is also a section on how the sections of the museum were created with the help of school children from all over London. This I find very intriguing and I feel proud that museums are encouraging people of all ages to visit and learn, I wish I had a better interest when I was younger.

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The exhibitions and collections start at London before London, taking you forward through Roman London, Medieval London, the Black Death and the Great Fire until you end at London as we know it today. One section I fell in love with is the Victorian Walk where you feel transported through time to the late 18th / early 19th century streets of London. You can stop in at the local cafe, sit at the bar of the pub or just wander down the cobblestone streets peering into the windows of many shops and stores.

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From the museum I head down to the Barbican, an arts and conference venue. This is an astonishing venue where you can find a range of events including the opera, conferences, free concerts, theatre and cinemas. You could spend all day wandering through the building, I choose to enter the library and spend the rainy afternoon looking through historic articles, books, magazines and a number of other resources available. After a few hours it’s time to head on home. I walk back to the underground through the barbican walkways, bridges that cross the busy streets below where you can access office buildings, cafés and boutique stores. You also get an amazing view of the courtyard of the Barbican and the pool that fills it. This pool is not for swimming, instead it adds colour to the brick Barbican and is filled with a walkway surrounded by plants and a water feature down the far end. I recommended everybody go and check out the Barbican, but be sure to look up what events are happening whilst you are in London.

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Virginia Woolf once said “to walk alone in London is the greatest rest.” I could not agree more.

Jess and Josh

Wheels turning and bells ringing. Is anyone home? Day 67

Wheels turning and bells ringing. Is anyone home? Day 67

I have a list of a million things I want to see and do whilst Josh is at work over the next few weeks, I also have a list of things we need to do together. So with Josh having a day off today it’s time to cross a few sights off that list. Today we see the sights that make London  famous for visitors and tourists and some of the most recognisable buildings and structures in the world. On our list today is the London Eye, Big Ben and Westminster Abbey.

As we emerge from Westminster underground station our eyes are drawn to the magnificent structure on the south bank of the Thames River. Standing at 135 metres tall, the London Eye spins showing visitors some of the best views of London. This observatory was first developed in 1999, opening in 2000 and is one of the worlds most recognisable observatories in the world, and crowned the largest Ferris Wheel in Europe. We can see the line from where we stand and decide that we will explore south bank and ride the Eye another day.

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Suddenly we hear bells chiming behind us and we spin to realise that we are standing directly under Big Ben. This clock stands tall and shadows the ground beneath it. It really is an amazing sight and a must see when you travel to London. Big Ben is attached to one of the Houses of Parliament, a row of buildings that were built to house government officials. As we walk along we stumble upon the Queens entrance where security seems much tighter.

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Next stop is Westminster Abbey, a church most of you would know as the location of Prince William and Princess Katherine’s wedding. The exterior of this church is stunning, so much detail has gone into every inch of stone and although we missed out on going inside by five minutes, we did sneak through the gift shop and quickly stick our heads in. It is undeniable that the inside is just as stunning as the out.

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A quick walk through Parliament Square leads us towards Downing St. But first we need to engage in a classic London tourist tradition, we take our photos inside the famous red telephone box. It’s so popular in this area that we actually had to wait in line just to get inside one! When we arrive to the entrance of Downing St it is blocked by black gates and several security guards. There’s no getting close to number ten, the home and office of the Prime Minister, but you can catch a glimpse if you look close enough.

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The good thing about sight seeing in London is that a lot of things are within walking distance to another. We realise we are close to Buckingham Palace and decide to cross that from the list as well. We walk through the Horse Guard and into St James Park. Walking along the lake we see ducks, swans and geese being chased by children, squirrels being taunted by dogs and people relaxing and enjoying this sunny London afternoon. Finally we reach Buckingham Palace. The flag is raised so somebody is home, although they aren’t going to just let anyone inside. The gate is raised high with guards standing at every entrance, eyes peeled for anybody not doing the right thing. We snap a few photos before it starts to pour down with rain. We take that as our sign to head home and Josh is more than happy to have a night of nothing, before he heads back to work tomorrow.

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Jess and Josh

Wining and dining. Day 65 and 66

Wining and dining. Day 65 and 66

What better way to start our first London weekend than with Big Breakfast Saturday. Poached eggs, bacon, pork sausages and homemade hollandaise with a coffee from the local cafe. Today is going to be a good day. It’s 11am and time to load up the pork. Josh is busy in the kitchen with Viv watching his every move, hoping to replicate this when we leave. Fresh herbs, onion, cider, tomatoes, garlic and more go into this 5 kilo beast and then it’s in the oven until dinner time. Pulled pork can’t really overcook so we leave this suckling in the oven for 8 hours.

Now usually I would be the first one to raise my hand to make desserts but creativity is lacking today, instead we head to Camden Passage, a small antique community filled with shops, markets, cafés and patisseries. David points out the best gelato in London that I store in my memory for another time. Finally we stop at a cafe that is overflowing with cakes in the window and people out the door. We send in Viv and after what seems like a lifetime, she emerges carrying bags of pastries, cakes and slices. A quick stop at the park so Maggie can run off some energy and it’s back to check on the pork.

David cracks some wine as guests start arriving, it’s showtime. Pork is removed from the oven to rest and while we wait chef Josh and I prepare the mushrooms, carrots, polenta and creamed leeks for the feast. Now to get our hands dirty, pulling pork is not hard work when you cook it for as long as we have, meat falls from the bone and we toss it through the sauce it’s been cooking in. Accompanied by some pork crackling and dinner is served. There is something so relaxing about having a dinner party and it’s something Josh and I really enjoy but don’t do enough of. But look out because when we return your all invited.

Dinner winds down shortly after midnight and with work tomorrow Josh is in need of some rest. With uniform and knives ready to go he falls straight to sleep.

That 8am start is looming closer and closer.

Day 66

The day is finally here where Josh starts his stage at The Ledbury, lead by non other than fellow Australian chef Brett Graham. As most of you know, Josh won a culinary competition last October where he was awarded a scholarship to travel to London and work at The Ledbury, ranked number 13 in San Pellegrino’s Worlds Best 5o Restaurants.

While Josh is hard at work, I decide to treat myself to a day of nothing. With very little on tv we all sit down to watch a movie so terrible I won’t even mention the name, the highlight being the gelato we ate while the movie was on (some of that ‘best gelato in London’ I mentioned before). While the rain pours outside we all settle in with some spicy salami pizza from the local pub and some more tv.

There’s nothing like a lazy Sunday.

Jess and Josh,